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Season of the Itch: Why Weather Causes Sensitive SkinSeason of the Itch: Why Weather Causes Sensitive SkinSeason of the Itch: Why Weather Causes Sensitive SkinSeason of the Itch: Why Weather Causes Sensitive Skin

Season of the Itch: Why Weather Causes Sensitive Skin

Weather changes constantly and your sensitive skin takes notice. Winter weather may mean cozy scarves and delicious cups of hot chocolate to some, but to others, it means the season of the itch. Winter brings dry air, which can cause sensitive skin to dry out and itch. Warm weather and sun can also increase skin’s sensitivity due to ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure. While it’s hard for sensitive skin to retain natural moisture, there are simple things that you can do to help.

Tips for Sensitive Skin During Cold Weather
During the winter, many people find their skin becomes cracked, itchy, tight, red, and dry. Some things you can do for your skin during the winter is to:

  1. Use a moisturizer daily, such as one of the AVEENO® ULTRA CALMING® Daily Moisturizers. Using a moisturizer can help to give your sensitive skin the nourishment it’s lacking, due to the drying effects of cold weather. It can also help protect your skin from the climate and leave it feeling soft and smooth. Even on those cold, clear winter days it is important to protect your skin from UV rays. You can try the AVEENO® ULTRA CALMING® Daily Moisturizer with SPF 15 or 30 to protect your sensitive skin.
  2. Avoid taking long, hot showers. This can melt and strip away the skin's natural oil barrier.
  3. Avoid harsh soaps and detergents. Many popular soaps and detergents contain ingredients that can strip moisture from your skin. Stay away from soaps that use sulfates and perfumes, and look for products that contain skin-calming ingredients such as colloidal oatmeal, feverfew, aloe, and lavender instead.
  4. Invest in a humidifier.Central heating, space heaters, and fireplaces all reduce humidity in the air and can dry your skin. A humidifier will help replace moisture in the air.

Tips for Sensitive Skin during Warm Weather
During the warmer months, many people with sensitive skin struggle to find a happy medium between oily skin and dry skin. Help your skin find that equilibrium with these tips:

  1. Use a moisturizer daily, such as one of the AVEENO® ULTRA CALMING® Daily Moisturizers. . Just like in winter, using a moisturizer in warmer weather can help to give your sensitive skin nourishment it may be lacking. It also helps protect your skin from the climate and leaves it feeling soft and smooth. A lotion is better to use in warm weather than a cream, since it is lighter and allows the skin to breathe.
  2. Use SPF. UV radiation can cause the skin to burn, dry, and flake off. Using a minimum SPF of 15 can help protect your skin from the sun’s harmful UV rays and sunburn. AVEENO® ULTRA CALMING® Daily Moisturizer with SPF 30 can help protect your sensitive skin on those warm summer days.
  3. Use SPF that does not make your skin oily and break out. Some SPF products contain ingredients that make your skin oily and thus, prone to acne breakouts. Acne treatments usually contain ingredients that cause your skin to dry out (e.g., salicylic acid). So the more you break out, the more you use an acne treatment, and the more your skin will dry out.
  4. Clean your skin after being in the sun.Warm and humid climates tend to make your skin sweat, which can lead to a break out. As mentioned before, acne treatments usually contain ingredients that dry your skin. Cleaning your skin after being out in the sun also helps to avoid heat rash. Heat rash happens when the sweat gland ducts become blocked due to excessive sweating, and that sweat is not allowed to evaporate from a specific area on the body. Heat rash usually goes away on its own or with at-home treatment in three-to-four days, but may require medical treatment if symptoms persist or worsen.

While weather is unavoidable, sensitive skin isn’t. These facts and simple solutions can help you manage dry, itchy sensitive skin.

Sources:
http://www.medicinenet.com/heat_rash/page2.htm#what_are_the_causes_of_heat_rash
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dry-skin/basics/causes/con-20030009
http://www.webmd.com/beauty/dry-skin-13/dry-skin-causes